Category Archives: Recreation

Living A Life That Matters

Trust the one who can see these three things in you,

Sorrow behind your smile,

Love behind your anger

And reason behind your silence

For beautiful things are not always good

But good things are always beautiful.

Always choose to heal, not to hurt

To forgive, not to despise

To persevere, not to quit

To smile, not to frown

To love, not to hate.

At the end of life what really matters

is not what we brought, but what we built

Not what we got, but what we shared

Not our competence, but our character

Not our success but our significance.

Live a life that matters, Live a life that cares!

Big Ideas Conceptualised In Great Quotes!

Great quotes encapsulate big ideas in few words.  They inspire, motivate, and encourage in a memorable way.  On this blog I like to cover all aspects of building wealth, including interviewing authors, investors, and business owners who have achieved great success. In that spirit, I’ve assembled the top 100 quotes about money.

  1. Too many people spend money they earned..to buy things they don’t want..to impress people that they don’t like. –Will Rogers
  2. A wise person should have money in their head, but not in their heart. –Jonathan Swift
  3. Wealth consists not in having great possessions, but in having few wants. –Epictetus
  4. Money often costs too much. –Ralph Waldo Emerson
  5. Everyday is a bank account, and time is our currency. No one is rich, no one is poor, we’ve got 24 hours each. –Christopher Rice
  6. It’s how you deal with failure that determines how you achieve success. –David Feherty
  7. Frugality includes all the other virtues. –Cicero
  8. I love money. I love everything about it. I bought some pretty good stuff. Got me a $300 pair of socks. Got a fur sink. An electric dog polisher. A gasoline powered turtleneck sweater. And, of course, I bought some dumb stuff, too. –Steve Martin
  9. An investment in knowledge pays the best interest. –Benjamin Franklin
  10. I will tell you the secret to getting rich on Wall Street. You try to be greedy when others are fearful. And you try to be fearful when others are greedy. –Warren Buffett

Recommended by Forbes

·  Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pound ought and six, result misery. –Charles Dickens

·  Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work. –Thomas Edison

·  What we really want to do is what we are really meant to do. When we do what we are meant to do, money comes to us, doors open for us, we feel useful, and the work we do feels like play to us. –Julia Cameron

·  I never attempt to make money on the stock market. I buy on the assumption that they could close the market the next day and not reopen it for ten years. –Warren Buffett

·  A nickel ain’t worth a dime anymore. –Yogi Berra

·  Money never made a man happy yet, nor will it. The more a man has, the more he wants. Instead of filling a vacuum, it makes one. –Benjamin Franklin

·  Many people take no care of their money till they come nearly to the end of it, and others do just the same with their time. –Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

·  Formal education will make you a living; self-education will make you a fortune. –Jim Rohn

·  Money is only a tool. It will take you wherever you wish, but it will not replace you as the driver. –Ayn Rand

·  Financial peace isn’t the acquisition of stuff. It’s learning to live on less than you make, so you can give money back and have money to invest. You can’t win until you do this. –Dave Ramsey

·  It is not the man who has too little, but the man who craves more, that is poor. –Seneca

·  It’s not the employer who pays the wages. Employers only handle the money. It’s the customer who pays the wages. –Henry Ford

·  He who loses money, loses much; He who loses a friend, loses much more; He who loses faith, loses all. –Eleanor Roosevelt

·  Happiness is not in the mere possession of money; it lies in the joy of achievement, in the thrill of creative effort. –Franklin D. Roosevelt

·  Empty pockets never held anyone back. Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that. –Norman Vincent Peale

·  It’s good to have money and the things that money can buy, but it’s good, too, to check up once in a while and make sure that you haven’t lost the things that money can’t buy. –George Lorimer

·  You can only become truly accomplished at something you love. Don’t make money your goal. Instead, pursue the things you love doing, and then do them so well that people can’t take their eyes off you. –Maya Angelou

·  Buy when everyone else is selling and hold until everyone else is buying. That’s not just a catchy slogan. It’s the very essence of successful investing. –J. Paul Getty

·  If money is your hope for independence you will never have it. The only real security that a man will have in this world is a reserve of knowledge, experience, and ability. –Henry Ford

·  If all the economists were laid end to end, they’d never reach a conclusion. –George Bernard Shaw

·  How many millionaires do you know who have become wealthy by investing in savings accounts? I rest my case. –Robert G. Allen

·  I made my money the old-fashioned way. I was very nice to a wealthy relative right before he died. –Malcolm Forbes

·  Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower. –Steve Jobs

·  The real measure of your wealth is how much you’d be worth if you lost all your money. –Anonymous

·  Money is a terrible master but an excellent servant. –P.T. Barnum

·  Try to save something while your salary is small; it’s impossible to save after you begin to earn more. –Jack Benny

·  Wealth is the ability to fully experience life. –Henry David Thoreau

·  The individual investor should act consistently as an investor and not as a speculator. –Ben Graham

·  I’m a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work the more I have of it. –Thomas Jefferson

·  You must gain control over your money or the lack of it will forever control you. –Dave Ramsey

·  Investing should be more like watching paint dry or watching grass grow. If you want excitement, take $800 and go to Las Vegas. –Paul Samuelson

·  Every time you borrow money, you’re robbing your future self. –Nathan W. Morris

·  Rich people have small TVs and big libraries, and poor people have small libraries and big TVs. –Zig Ziglar

·  Never spend your money before you have it. –Thomas Jefferson

·  The stock market is filled with individuals who know the price of everything, but the value of nothing. –Phillip Fisher

·  Wealth is not his that has it, but his that enjoys it. –Benjamin Franklin

·  It’s not how much money you make, but how much money you keep, how hard it works for you, and how many generations you keep it for. –Robert Kiyosaki

·  I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work. –Thomas A. Edison

·  If you don’t value your time, neither will others. Stop giving away your time and talents. Value what you know & start charging for it. –Kim Garst

·  Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do. –Steve Jobs

·  The habit of saving is itself an education; it fosters every virtue, teaches self-denial, cultivates the sense of order, trains to forethought, and so broadens the mind. –T.T. Munger

·  Don’t tell me what you value, show me your budget, and I’ll tell you what you value.” –Joe Biden

·  If you live for having it all, what you have is never enough. –Vicki Robin

·  Before you speak, listen. Before you write, think. Before you spend, earn. Before you invest, investigate. Before you criticize, wait. Before you pray, forgive. Before you quit, try. Before you retire, save. Before you die, give. –William A. Ward

·  We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give. –Winston Churchill

·  Wealth after all is a relative thing since he that has little and wants less is richer than he that has much and wants more. –Charles Caleb Colton

·  Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted. –Albert Einstein

·  It is time for us to stand and cheer for the doer, the achiever, the one who recognizes the challenge and does something about it. –Vince Lombardi

·  It’s not the situation, but whether we react (negative) or respond (positive) to the situation that’s important. –Zig Ziglar

·  A successful man is one who can lay a firm foundation with the bricks others have thrown at him. –David Brinkley

·  Let him who would enjoy a good future waste none of his present. –Roger Babson

·  Courage is being scared to death, but saddling up anyway. –John Wayne

·  Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever. –Mahatma Gandhi

·  Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. –Mark Twain

·  It is our choices, that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities. –J. K Rowling

·  The successful warrior is the average man, with laser-like focus. –Bruce Lee

·  Develop success from failures. Discouragement and failure are two of the surest stepping stones to success. –Dale Carnegie

·  The question isn’t who is going to let me; it’s who is going to stop me. –Ayn Rand

·  Don’t let the fear of losing be greater than the excitement of winning. –Robert Kiyosaki

·  You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something – your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. This approach has never let me down, and it has made all the difference in my life. –Steve Jobs

·  Let no feeling of discouragement prey upon you, and in the end you are sure to succeed. –Abraham Lincoln

·  Screw it, Let’s do it! –Richard Branson

·  If your ship doesn’t come in, swim out to meet it! –Jonathan Winters

·  People often say that motivation doesn’t last. Well, neither does bathing – that’s why we recommend it daily. –Zig Ziglar

·  A real entrepreneur is somebody who has no safety net underneath them. –Henry Kravis

·  As long as you’re going to be thinking anyway, think big. –Donald Trump

·  The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary. –Vidal Sassoon

·  Success is walking from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm. –Winston Churchill

·  Without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement, and success have no meaning. –Benjamin Franklin

·  If plan A fails, remember there are 25 more letters. –Chris Guillebeau

·  Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. –Ralph Waldo Emerson

·  A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step. –Lao Tzu

·  Do the one thing you think you cannot do. Fail at it. Try again. Do better the second time. The only people who never tumble are those who never mount the high wire. This is your moment. Own it. –Oprah Winfrey

·  Believe you can and you’re halfway there. –Theodore Roosevelt

·  The Stock Market is designed to transfer money from the Active to the Patient. –Warren Buffett

·  I’m only rich because I know when I’m wrong…I basically have survived by recognizing my mistakes. –George Soros

·  Persist – don’t take no for an answer. If you’re happy to sit at your desk and not take any risk, you’ll be sitting at your desk for the next 20 years. –David Rubenstein

·  If you took our top fifteen decisions out, we’d have a pretty average record. It wasn’t hyperactivity, but a hell of a lot of patience. You stuck to your principles and when opportunities came along, you pounced on them with vigor. –Charlie Munger

·  When buying shares, ask yourself, would you buy the whole company? –Rene Rivkin

·  If you have trouble imagining a 20% loss in the stock market, you shouldn’t be in stocks. –John Bogle

·  My old father used to have a saying:  If you make a bad bargain, hug it all the tighter. –Abraham Lincoln

·  It takes as much energy to wish as it does to plan. –Eleanor Roosevelt

·  The four most expensive words in the English language are, ‘This time it’s different.’ –Sir John Templeton

·  I’d like to live as a poor man with lots of money. –Pablo Picasso

·  Fortune sides with him who dares. –Virgil

·  Wealth is like sea-water; the more we drink, the thirstier we become; and the same is true of fame. –Arthur Schopenhauer

·  If we command our wealth, we shall be rich and free. If our wealth commands us, we are poor indeed. –Edmund Burke

·  No wealth can ever make a bad man at peace with himself. –Plato

·  My formula for success is rise early, work late and strike oil. –JP Getty

30 WAYS TO MAKE PROGRESS

  1. Wake up early
  2. Read daily
  3. Eat well
  4. Love yourself
  5. Judge less
  6. Be yourself
  7. Set goals
  8. Plan your day
  9. Positive attitude
  10. Have purpose
  11. Find inspiration
  12. Help others
  13. Network
  14. Save Money
  15. Automate
  16. Delegate
  17. Track finances
  18. Build a brand
  19. Fail Fast
  20. Interact
  21. Learn Skills
  22. Invest
  23. Journal
  24. Meditate
  25. Get a mentor
  26. Think big
  27. Be productive
  28. Do more
  29. Spend wisely
  30. Be ambitious

IN THE END…

Precious Memories!

all the small things make a big difference

every step is crucial

life isn’t about a single moment of great triumph

it’s about the trials and errors that slowly get you there

the blood, sweat, tears and the small,

inconsequential things you do on a day-to-day basis

it all matters in the end

every step, every regret, every decision, every minor setback

and every minuscule win.

all this has strengthened you

all of this has led you to every success you’ve every had

all of this has made you who you are today

and all of this proves that you have the

strength to deal with the challenges

that are in front of you

The Sweet Spot: Passion, Profit, and Value!

The Sweet Spot – The Intersection of Passion, Profit, and Value

Passion, profit, and value is the key to sustainable results:

  • Passion.  Your passion is your fuel for making things happen.  In today’s skill-for-hire economy, one of your most important assets is your passion.  It’s you’re staying power, and your get up and go, especially when you get knocked down.  It’s how you get up again.  Passion is also a proxy for your values, strengths, and purpose.  Strengths can be skills, but in this case, I’m also thinking about your natural strengths … the stuff that comes easy for you, but might be tough for others.   We tend to love what we’re awesome at, and, our passion tends to help us get awesome to begin with.
  • Profit.  This is about how much you can make.  Just because you create tons of value, doesn’t mean you can make a profit, especially in an economy where free is the new price, and your competition gives away what you try to sell.  How do you know what’s making a profit?  You ask.  This is where your network comes in.  Also, your friendly neighborhood accountant might be the perfect source for knowing what’s making money, and what’s not.
  • Value.  The idea here is that if you’re creating value, you have a better chance of getting rewarded.  Value is in the eye of the beholder.  This means staying aware of what the market values and knowing that the market doesn’t always drive the right thing.  This also means being aware of intrinsic vs. market value. Intrinsic value is what something is really worth, while market value is what people are willing to pay, which could be wildly inflated.  Personally, I like to optimize around providing value for basic needs, and I’m cautious when market value and intrinsic value are out of whack … market corrections can be painful.

To give you an example of the passion, profit and value intersection, I have a passion for making others great.  There’s a certain market value to that.  I already do it for free, but if I wanted to profit from it, I would take on certain clients.  For example, if the President wanted me for his results coach, I’d give him my special presidential discount, but I would still expect to profit from the value I create.

OK, fine, I’d do it for free, so it’s not a great example.

Cutting Questions to Find Your Path

Here are some cutting questions to help find and test your paths …

  • What would you do for free?
  • What’s the minimum you need to make?
  • What’s your minimum and ideal life style?
  • How much do you need to fund your ideal life style?
  • Who has the job that you want that you can model from?

Guideline for Getting Results

Some guidelines for results …

  • Find the intersections of your passion, profit, and value.
  • Passion, profit and value are sliding scales … this gives you a lot of flexibility as well as trade-offs.
  • If you’re creating all value, and no profit, that’s a charity, and that won’t pay your bills.
  • If you’re playing to your passion, but creating no value, that’s a hobby.
  • If you do what you hate, you’ll suck your life force dry.
  • Find the job you love, or love the job your with.
  • You can love the job you’re with, by by changing your why or changing your how. 
  • Some hobbies can be turned into profit, if they create value.
  • Sometimes the key to unleashing your profit potential, is simply finding the right channel or platform.
  • Be careful what you get paid for, because if you externalize your reward, you can kill your passion.
  • Knowing the market demand and the profit potential can help you follow the money.
  • Money is a means, not an end.   When you’re below the line, it means everything.  Once you’re above the line, happiness is doing what you love and service to others … you know, the stuff Maslow taught us.

One important point here is that life’s not static and neither is the market.

One strategy is to follow the growth.  This includes following the growth in the market (think biotech, green, … etc.) as well as following paths that lead to your own personal growth.

It’s one way to keep the skills that pay the bills.

COMMON SENSE

Today we mourn the passing of a beloved old friend, Common Sense, who has been with us for many years. No one knows for sure how old he was, since his birth records were long ago lost in bureaucratic red tape. He will be remembered as having cultivated such valuable lessons as:

  • Knowing when to come in out of the rain;
  • Why the early bird gets the worm;
  • Life isn’t always fair;
  • And maybe it was my fault.

Common Sense lived by simple, sound financial policies (don’t spend more than you can earn) and reliable strategies (adults, not children, are in charge).

His health began to deteriorate rapidly when well-intentioned but overbearing regulations were set in place. Reports of a 6-year-old boy charged with sexual harassment for kissing a classmate; teens suspended from school for using mouthwash after lunch; and a teacher fired for reprimanding an unruly student, only worsened his condition.

Common Sense lost ground when parents attacked teachers for doing the job that they themselves had failed to do in disciplining their unruly children.

It declined even further when schools were required to get parental consent to administer sun lotion or an aspirin to a student; but could not inform parents when a student became pregnant and wanted to have an abortion.

Common Sense lost the will to live as the churches became businesses; and criminals received better treatment than their victims.

Common Sense took a beating when you couldn’t defend yourself from a burglar in your own home and the burglar could sue you for assault.

Common Sense finally gave up the will to live, after a woman failed to realize that a steaming cup of coffee was hot. She spilled a little in her lap, and was promptly awarded a huge settlement.

Common Sense was preceded in death,
-by his parents, Truth and Trust,
-by his wife, Discretion,
-by his daughter, Responsibility,
-and by his son, Reason.

He is survived by his 5 stepbrothers;

  • I Know My Rights
  • I Want It Now
  • Someone Else Is To Blame
  • I’m A Victim
  • Pay me for Doing Nothing

Not many attended his funeral because so few realized he was gone.

If you still remember him, pass this on. If not, join the majority and do nothing

It’s Not About Doing Things Perfectly

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.”

Try Stuff, Even If It’s Not Perfect

It reminds me to keep things real and not get caught up in perfection, or the ideal that does not exist.

That’s the essence and foundation for personal growth.

It reminds me just to try…to give my best effort… to get in the arena and go for it… even if it’s not pretty and it’s not perfect.

And  it’s that fundamental mindset that sets the stage to be able to practice the things that lead to doing great things, even if it’s not pretty, and it’s not perfect.

It’s not about perfection.

It’s about progress… and progress is actually one of the secrets to happiness.

When we grow, we light up our life, even if it’s in some small way.

10 Reminders About Not Doing Things Perfectly

Too many people die with their music still in them, or they never realize their potential, because they get caught up in perfection.

Here are a few of my other favorite reminders about not worrying about doing things perfectly:

  1. A friend of mine was good about reminding me: “Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.”  That was his way of saying to me, focus on “good enough for now” so we could move on the next challenge, and not get stuck in analysis paralysis or the perfection trap.
  2. Similarly, Voltaire put it, ““The best is the enemy of the good.”  Voltaire always has a way with words.
  3. I always liked the phrase: “Make it work, then make it right.”   (balanced with the idea that if you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over 😉  … another way to think of this is, don’t get caught up in pre-mature perfection.
  4. Perfection is a journey, not a destination.  Enjoy the journey of learning and mastery.   This is the essence of continuous improvement.   Thinking back, this is really the big idea that helped me avoid a life of worrying about perfection, and instead, focus on progress.
  5. Focus on progress over perfection.  I always liked the idea that to get better at something, you have to do it more than once.  It takes practice.  You can’t practice very much if you are caught up in perfection.  When I think about it like that, it reminds me of Simon Sinek’s phrasing, “Better is better than best.”
  6. One of my best mentors was good at asking, “Is it effective?”   That was a much better focus, than worrying about some arbitrary notion or measure of perfection.  It was a simple reminder that if it wasn’t working, change your approach.   It’s far better to focus on effectiveness, improvement, or progress.   That’s where the growth is.
  7. As Confucius put it, “Better a diamond with a flaw than a pebble without.”  Talk about trading up.
  8. As Shakespeare put it, “Striving to better, oft we mar what’s well.”  I’ve seen so many good things, come to an end, either for the sake of perfection, or over-doing something that was better in it’s rough and useful form.  I’ve seen some great art, great ideas, and great projects die that way.  Sometimes you just need to leave well enough alone.
  9. As my mechanic always said, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”   He was incredibly pragmatic about where to invest time and energy, and not to throw good money after bad.
  10. As Leo Tolstoy put it, “If you look for perfection, you’ll never be content.”   It’s one thing to have great expectations, but don’t let your expectations drain the juice out of your life. 

Perfectionism Is Fundamentally Flawed

Here’s what Wikipedia says about perfectionism:

“Perfectionism: a personality trait characterized by a person’s striving for flawlessness and setting high performance standards, accompanied by critical self-evaluations and concerns regarding others’ evaluations.”

Yuck.

Don’t Fear Perfection

The good news is you don’t ever have to fear perfection.

As Salvador Dali reminds us with his inspiring words:

“Have no fear of perfection – you’ll never reach it.”

How perfect is that?

Food for Thought

 

One who loves till her eyes close, is a Mother.
One who loves without an expression in the eyes, is a Father.
____________________________
Mother – Introduces you to the world.
Father – Introduces the world to you.
___________________________
Mother : Gives you life
Father : Gives you living
__________________________
Mother : Makes sure you are not starving.
Father : Makes sure you know the value of starving
__________________________
Mother : Personifies Care
Father: Personifies Responsibility
__________________________
Mother : Protects you from a fall
Father : Teaches you to get up from a fall.
__________________________
Mother : Teaches you walking.
Father : Teaches you walk of life
__________________________
Mother : Teaches from her own experiences.
Father : Teaches you to learn from your own experiences.
__________________________
Mother : Reflects Ideology
Father : Reflects Reality
___________________________
Mother’s love is known to you since birth.
Father’s love is known when you become a Father or mother
_________________________
Dedicated to Parents!

Never Back Down

“Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.” — T.S. Elliot

You only get one chance at this life, so live it to the fullest. Don’t wast your time worrying about what anyone might say, or could possibly think about you-these are things you cannot control. If there is one guaranteed way to throw you life away it is to live it based on the potential of someone else’s disapproval. Do what you love, do what makes you happy, and never back down.

Have a wonder ful Day!!

make it worthwhile
make it worthwhile

Start your day with fresh fruits or juice

have some fresh air and breath deeply

whenever you can smile genuinely

at least once a day stay away from smoking

be active

try to spare 20 minutes for physical exercise

everyday have your sleep

out love your green vegetables

spend more quality time with your loved ones

keep stress away from your life!

love Jambu

17 Counterintuitive Things Successful People Do

Success
Success

1) They pick fights to test others resolve in their own beliefs.

in business you can’t turn over the reins to someone who doesn’t know how to defend their own ideas and plans.

2) Isolate yourself to re-energize

if you charge when you are by yourself you need to seek out isolation from time to time.

3)Purposefully offend

Sometimes the only way to get someones attention is to call him or her out

4)Hyper self critical

of your own standards and choices

5)Peacock

Don’t give others the option not to see you or hear your message.

6)Repeat mistakes enough times until we really learn the lesson

We hardly learn anything truly worthwhile one try.

7)Seek out rejection to get dis-sensitized to the fear of it

Once we lose the fear of rejection, we more easily go after what we want, and thus get more of it.

8)Ignore consensus

when your own data and foresight is convincingly contrary to the wisdom of the crowd

9)Expect nothing in return for helping your peers

10)Quit those en devours you will never win at and take a new swing at the plate

don’t double down on a losing effort by not knowing when to walk away.

11)Play possum with your competitors

Don’t be so eager to show off your strengths until it’s the perfect time to strike

12)Get C’s instead of A’s

If you excel in non-traditional environments (like Entrepreneurs) & can justify the opportunity cost of your time.

13)Become indifferent to slights

Because time and energy are too valuable to waste on petty matters

14)Self Sabotage yourself when you find yourself mired in complacency

Don’t ever get too comfortable  with the status quo, always be willing to blow it up and start all over again to truly create something better

15)Abstain from work which others can do for you

Delegate every task that others can do 80% as well as you, and focus on those items that only you can achieve that have big payoffs.

16)Plot and scheme your next couple moves ahead

know where you are going far in advance of making your first move.

17)Underestimate demand for your products and services

Don’t ever assume people want what you got, and you will always have the appropriate amount of urgency and hustle to validate what you are trying to achieve.

Inspiring Shipments by Ivana

this is a post from a special person i hold dear for the depth of knowledge that she has shared to the masses and on a personal level because she inspired me to start blogging some two years ago.
thanks Ivana.

Inspiring Shipments (#IS) by Ivana Sendecka

Hi hi hi my dear SCG,

believe it or not, on 17th September 2012  this blog reached another milestone on its journey. Three years ago was the first time I have posted a blog post in this digital space. Naive,   enthusiastic , fearless, driven,  a bit “I know it all”,   “let me save the world” Ivana  posted a video about quitting my job and with title “End, which got me to begin.” Indeed in 2009, closed a door on security, on predictability, on the beaten path of a 9 to 5 job  walked by too many before me.  I have jumped with a bliss of  ignorant  beginner into the world where those who really do the work  meet,  create and collaborate. I have learned how little I know about myself , about human nature and about the world out there.  It is three  years since I set…

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`10 takeaways from the desert safari!

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1) the journey is more important than the destination

2)be remarkable/different/unique/peculiar

3)be missed/connect/create a meaning/matter

4)don’t burn bridges/change is a constant

5)don’t wait for perfect/life is short/maximize every opportunity

6)be in it for the long haul/make the journey worth it

7)change the frame to change your game/re-frame things to change your perspective

8)live with passion/follow your heart/make your work play and play at your work

9)smile, it’s contagious/don’t take yourself too seriously

10)make meaning over money/there are some things money just can’t buy

How to Manage Time Effectively

Time is precious.

Managing Time

Time management is one of those skills that you don’t learn in school or university, yet it is one of the most important skills that you must master in order to be successful in today’s competitive workplace.

It doesn’t matter how many years of experience you have or how skilled you are; your inability to manage your time well enough to get your work done will definitely cause numerous difficulties and complications to both your professional and social lives. Careers are made or broken on your ability to handle multiple tasks and manage your time, no matter what type of work you do.

In that regard, I have come up with a number of time management techniques to help you achieve your career goals and maintain a balanced working life.

A)     Prioritize tasks with Pareto’s 80/20 principle

Effective time managers are aware of the fact that they cannot do everything that has to be done at once. They prioritize tasks by consciously choosing to spend their time on what is most important to them. The key to effectively time management is to apply the “80/20 Principle”, which states that 80 per cent of your results are produced from 20 per cent of your efforts. This rule will help you discover the percentage of tasks that you need to focus on so as to achieve the greatest returns on your efforts with the limited amount of time that you have.

B)      Manage time allocation with Parkinson’s law

Parkinson’s Law states that “work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion”. It means that the time you need to complete a certain tasks depends on the time you originally give yourself to get it done with. If you give yourself a tight timeline to do something, you won’t start because you implicitly know that the time frame is unrealistic. If you allocate too much time to complete the task, you won’t start either, because you secretly know that you still have a lot of time on your hands.

C)      Get it the right the first time with Total Quality Managements

TQM is a process whereby the need to get everything right the first time and to continually improve your production is required.  Total Quality Management is not about doing more; it’s about improving the quality of important tasks at hand. This might take a little more time in the beginning but will definitely reduce rework required to fix mistakes and will save a lot of time in the long run.

Contrary to popular belief, time management is not about doing more things in less time, but it’s about doing the right things better. Keep in mind that the more you bite off, the longer you have to chew.

D)     Taking control of technology

The internet is definitely one of the top time wasters in today’s corporate world; it can actually consume a whole working day before you even notice. Your email, for example, has grown into a serious time drainer with your inbox getting out of control throughout the day. But just because someone can contact you instantly, it does not mean that you have to reply immediately. Unless you job demands that, do not respond to your emails immediately, instead, assign a few times a day to check it and respond and don’t look at it otherwise.

Whether you feel overwhelmed by your workload or you just want to find an extra few minutes in the day, one fact will always remain the same: we all have the same 24hours and you really can’t manage that time, but you can manage yourself better. If you don’t time will do a pretty good job of managing you.

 

How To Think Like Bill Gates

bill gates

10 Ways to Think Like Bill Gates
While I don’t think Bill will lend you his brain, you can do the next best thing. You can take some of this thought patterns and practices for a test-drive. Here are ten patterns to get you started:

  1. Prioritize. “What’s the next best thing you should be thinking about?” It starts here. Time is your most limited and precious resource. This is about asking whether the problem is even worth your time. Before you throw cycles at it, figure out whether it’s worth it. Is it significant? How much time should you spend on it? For an example of how Bill Gates figures out how to prioritize.
  2. Ask smarter questions. If you want better answers, ask better questions. Rather than getting stuck in one line of questioning, such as “what’s wrong with this?” or “what’s right with this?”, you can explore your thinking more deeply, by asking a range of questions. One of the skills we learn at Microsoft is Precision Questions / Precision Answers. In this approach, there are 7 categories of precise questions: 1) Go / NoGo – Do we need to talk about this? 2) Clarification – What do you mean? 3) Assumptions – What are we assuming? 4) Basic Critical Question – How do we know this is true? 5) Causes – What’s causing this? 6) Effects – What will be the effects? 7) Action – What should be done?
  3. Make data-driven decisions. This is one of the toughest switches to make. By default, most people make emotional decisions and then find data to support the decision. This means asking questions like, “what’s the data say?” This means getting informed, before you make your decision. This means evaluating the sources of data. It’s an extreme exercise in emotional intelligence to pause your emotional response, while you check your logic and critical thinking.
  4. Divorce your ego. This is where you separate yourself from the problem. This is also about separating yourself from the solution. Instead, you hold the problem or solution out in your hands and inspect it from different angles. Rather than focus on whether you’re right, it’s about whether the solution is right. It’s about being able to beat up the thinking, without taking it personally.
  5. Frame the problem. Framing a problem is simply how you look at a problem, just like how you frame a picture. It’s about choosing what to focus on, what’s in and what’s out. When you frame the problem, you bound it. Framing also helps you get a better perspective on the problem, as well as share the problem more effectively with others. Some questions to help frame a problem include: Who’s the customer? What are their needs and priorities? What’s happening in the market? What are competitors doing? What are our options for responding? How do we differentiate? How is technology changing and what possibilities does it offer our customers? What are the priorities for our business?
  6. Get perspectives on the problem. This means being able to switch your perspectives. Rather than see the glass half-full or the glass half-empty, you should see both. Challenge yourself to switch back and forth from finding flaws to finding opportunities. If you only know how to play the Devil’s advocate, you have a limited view. Like a mulch-faceted diamond, you should be able to look at the problem from different angles. This also means being able to broker in experts and get other people’s perspective on the problem. Problem solving is a team sport. It’s also about leveraging smart people without domain expertise. For example, you can take a dev manager in consumer devices and have him/her move into the enterprise or business applications.
  7. Model the problem. By abstracting the problem into a model, you can think about it in simpler ways, without being bogged down by the implementation details. One of Bill Gate’s favorite tools is his whiteboard. A whiteboard makes it easy to sketch out ideas and visualize them. A whiteboard can help whether you’re trying to map out the problem or draw a solution. Keep in mind that George Box taught us that, “all models are wrong, but some are useful.”
  8. Think of the system and the ecosystem. Bill Gates has an engineering mind. He can see the problem as a system. You can map out the system by asking yourself questions along the line of, what are the bits and pieces? … How does it work? … How do the bits and pieces work together? … what’s the flow through the system? … what are the inputs and outputs? After you have a handle on the system, you can ask yourself about the ecosystem or the system of systems.
  9. Think of the problem over time. It’s easy to look at the problem and just see it as a static snapshot. The challenge is playing out the problem or your solution over time. Time can dramatically change what it looks like. Consider the impact of trends. Consider sustainability. Some things that look good only temporary, and really break down when you apply time to them. Sometimes time is on your side. You might find that there may be better windows of opportunity.
  10. Think strategically. Strategy guides your actions. You can think strategically along different lines. Consider the core of what you do (mission, vision, values, and goals.) Consider internal analysis (strengths and weaknesses, resources and capabilities, and benchmarking.) Consider external analysis (competitive analysis, opportunities and threats, and industry conditions.) Consider the organization design (structure, controls and incentives, culture and people.) Consider execution (roles, responsibilities, resources, action plans, measurement, and accountability.) Consider functional strategies (marketing and sales, operations, human resources, and R&D.) Consider strategic choices (corporate strategy and business strategy.)

Outlook

Forget each kindness that you do
As soon as you have done it.
Forget the praise that falls to you
The moment you have won it.
Forget the slander that you hear
Before you can repeat it.
Forget each slight, each spite, each sheer
Wherever you may meet it.
Remember every kindness done
To you, whatever its measure.
Remember praise by others won
And pass it on with pleasure.
Remember every promise made
And keep it to the letter.
Remember those who lend you aid
And be a grateful debtor.
Remember all the happiness
That comes your way in living.
Forget each worry and distress;
Be hopeful and forgiving.
Remember good, remember truth,
Remember Heaven’s above you,
And you will find, through age and youth,
True joys and hearts to love you.

Life’s Tug Of War

Life can seem ungrateful and not always kind.
Life can pull at your heartstrings and play with your mind.
Life can be blissful and happy and free.
Life can put beauty in the things that you see.
Life can place challenges right at your feet.
Life can make good of the hardships we meet.
Life can overwhelm you and make your head spin.
Life can reward those determined to win.
Life can be hurtful and not always fair.
Life can surround you with people who care.
Life clearly does offer its ups and its downs.
Life’s days can bring you both smiles and frowns.
Life teaches us to take the good with the bad.
Life is a mixture of happy and sad.
SO…
Take the life that you have and give it your best.
Think positive be happy let God do the rest.
Take the challenges that life has laid at your feet.
Take pride and be thankful for each one you meet.
To yourself give forgiveness if you stumble and fall.
Take each day that is dealt you and give it your all..
Take the love that you’re given and return it with care.
Have faith that when needed it will always be there.
Take time to find the beauty in the things that you see.
Take life’s simple pleasures let them set your heart free.
The idea here is simply to even the score.
As you are met and faced with Life’s Tug of War.

Time to Breathe

If you only knew the reason, For the sudden change in season. For the trouble that was caused, And the life you put on pause. Halting this life in such a way, Made it hard to see a new day. Burning this day in my skull, Made it hard to reach even for a pull. Almost losing all of my grasp, Not much to grab on to nothing to clasp. And in the end the message is clear, With much to lose but nothing to fear. Even though at times with nothing to see, Strong perseverance will set you free.

Be The Best of Whatever You Are

If you can’t be a pine on the top of the hill,
Be a scrub in the valley-but be

The best little scrub by the side of the rill;
Be a bush if you can’t be a tree.

If you can’t be a bush be a bit of the grass,
And some highway happier make;

If you can’t be a muskie then just be a bass-
But the liveliest bass in the lake!

We can’t all be captains, we’ve got to be crew,
There’s something for all of us here,

There’s big work to do, and there’s lesser to do,
And the task you must do is the near.

If you can’t be a highway then just be a trail,
If you can’t be the sun be a star;

It isn’t by size that you win or you fail-
Be the best of whatever you are!